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Intersectionality

This zine offers a comprehensive exploration of the concept through an engaging activity designed to prompt youth reflection on the multifaceted aspects of their identity markers.

Summary

The Intersectionality zine offers a comprehensive exploration of the concept through an engaging activity designed to prompt youth reflection on the multifaceted aspects of their identity markers. Readers are reminded that their identities are not singular entities but intricate combinations, each contributing to their unique experiences. The zine underscores the presence of both privilege and barriers within individuals’ identities, encouraging readers to recognize and acknowledge these complexities in their day-to-day. The zine also urges youth to contemplate how they can leverage their privileged identities to foster solidarity with individuals who may not share those specific attributes. Overall, the zine provides a thoughtful and actionable guide for understanding and navigating the complexities of intersectionality. This is part of the collaborative 4-part zine series, #IYKYK. Download the PDF to see additional resources.

Vocabulary

  • Discrimination
  • Leverage
  • Monolith
  • Privilege
  • Socioeconomic class

Why Learn About It?

The “Intersectionality: Axis of Power & Privilege” zine is a guide for youth to explore their various identities and understand how these shape their experiences in relation to power and privilege. Understanding intersectionality is crucial for addressing the complex prejudices people face daily, providing a foundation for combating intertwined issues of power and privilege in society. By reflecting on their own identities, and their intersections, youth can practice being mindful to be better allies/co-conspirators for marginalized individuals/groups.

Before Reading Questions

  1. Break down the term “intersectionality.” What information can you gather from it? Feel free to start with the prefix inter and slowly move to section. What section do you think they are talking about and amongst what? Between whom?
  2. What identity markers do you show to other people? Which ones do you associate yourself most with?
  3. When do you fit in between different categories? What impact does it have to identify with two categories rather than one? (i.e.: Being in middle school and identifying as a girl vs being in middle school and identifying as non-binary — are these two experiences the same or different?)

After Reading Questions

  1. Take the activity in this zine a step further–Have students individually complete their own power and privilege wheel, or privilege axis. Then have them discuss in small groups (consider doing racial affinity groups):

    a. What privileged identity markers can you leverage to be in solidarity with the oppressed/marginalized group?

    b. Are there any identities that you don’t think about on a regular basis? Which ones can you never forget?

  2. Have students participate in the “My Fullest Name” activity.

About Collaborator

Healing Equity United consults on creating antiracist and anti-oppressive organizational cultures, facilitates interactive workshops and trainings, and conducts diversity, equity, and inclusion audits. Learn more about their work at www.healingequityunited.com.

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